Get Expert Insights on Choosing the Best Dog Bed for Post-TPLO Surgery Recovery

Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) tears are unfortunately very common in dogs, with over 1 million cases diagnosed each year. This ligament is similar to the ACL in humans and helps provide stability in the knee joint. When torn, it causes the knee to become unstable and painful. TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) surgery is one of the most common and effective treatments for CCL tears in dogs.

Proper aftercare and recovery following TPLO surgery are absolutely crucial for your dog to heal properly and regain full use of their leg. The recovery period typically lasts 8-12 weeks, during which activity must be strictly limited. Providing an orthopedic dog bed is one of the best ways to support your dog during this recovery process. The right bed will allow them to rest comfortably while also protecting their knee joint.

best-dog-bed-after-tplo-surgery

In this comprehensive guide, we will cover everything you need to know about choosing the best orthopedic dog bed to aid your dog’s post-TPLO surgery recovery. You’ll get an in-depth review of the top-rated beds, factors to consider when selecting a bed, the importance of rest after surgery, how a bed can help the healing process, additional recovery tips, and answers to frequently asked questions.

Table of Contents

Comprehensive Review of Orthopedic Dog Beds for Post-TPLO Recovery

Big Barker

Big Barker Orthopedic Dog Bed w/Headrest - 7” Dog Bed for Large Dogs w/Washable & Chew-Resistant...

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The Big Barker orthopedic dog bed is one of the highest-rated and most recommended beds for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery. It is designed with multiple layers of foam for unbeatable comfort and support. The therapeutic middle “egg crate” layer provides cushioning while keeping your dog’s body weight evenly distributed, which protects their joints. The high-density memory foam also resists flattening over time.

Big Barker beds provide excellent value for the price. They come with a 10-year warranty against flattening and have removable, washable covers. Sizes range from medium to giant breed. Hundreds of customer reviews mention the Big Barker helping their dogs recover comfortably from knee surgeries like TPLO.

Technical Aspects:
– Big Barker is a well-known brand that specializes in high-quality orthopedic dog beds.
– Their beds are made with premium materials, including a 7-inch therapeutic foam that provides excellent support and comfort for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery.
– The foam used in Big Barker beds is specifically designed to retain its shape and density over time, ensuring long-lasting durability.
– These beds also have a machine-washable cover, making it easy to keep them clean and hygienic during the recovery period.

Pros:
– Big Barker beds are recommended by veterinarians and orthopedic surgeons for post-TPLO surgery recovery due to their superior quality and support.
– The 7-inch foam provides optimum joint and muscle support, relieving pressure on the surgical site and promoting healing.
– The beds are available in various sizes to accommodate dogs of different breeds and sizes.
– They come with a 10-year warranty, highlighting the brand’s confidence in their product’s durability.
– Many dog owners report significant improvements in their dog’s comfort level and mobility after using Big Barker beds during the recovery process.

Cons:
– Big Barker beds can be relatively expensive compared to other options on the market.
– Some users have reported that the bed’s foam may take some time to fully expand and regain its original shape after unpacking.
– The heavyweight of the bed may make it difficult to move or transport if needed.

Recommended for:
– Big Barker beds are highly recommended for large and giant breed dogs recovering from TPLO surgery, as these dogs require extra support due to their size and weight.
– They are also suitable for dogs with pre-existing joint issues or arthritis, as the orthopedic foam provides relief and comfort for these conditions as well.


PetFusion

PetFusion Ultimate Dog Bed, Orthopedic Memory Foam, Multiple Sizes/Colors, Medium Firmness Pillow,...

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The PetFusion Ultimate Dog Bed is another top-rated option for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery. It features a solid 4-inch memory foam base for optimal support and comfort. The high-quality foam helps alleviate pressure points and promotes better sleep, which is crucial for the healing process. The bed also has a water-resistant and tear-resistant cover, making it durable and easy to clean.

The PetFusion Ultimate Dog Bed is another top choice that many owners turn to for orthopedic support after TPLO surgery. Its “egg crate” polyfill cushioning offers pressure relief by conforming to your dog’s body and distributing weight evenly. The bolstered sides provide additional comfort and security.

This bed is water resistant, easy to clean, and competitively priced. It comes in a range of sizes to accommodate dogs from 25 to over 100 pounds. Satisfied customers love the PetFusion bed for aiding their dogs’ recovery from ACL and CCL repairs.

Pros of the PetFusion Ultimate Dog Bed:
– Provides excellent support and comfort with a thick memory foam base
– Water-resistant and tear-resistant cover for durability
– Easy to clean, with a removable and machine-washable cover
– Non-skid bottom to prevent slipping and sliding
– Comes in multiple sizes to accommodate different dog breeds

Cons of the PetFusion Ultimate Dog Bed:
– Some customers have reported that the cover may be difficult to remove and put back on
– The bed may be too firm for some dogs who prefer a softer surface

Recommended for: Medium to large breed dogs recovering from TPLO surgery who need a supportive and comfortable bed.


Friends Forever

Friends Forever Memory Foam Orthopedic Dog Bed Lounge Sofa, Machine Washable Removable Cover,...

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The Friends Forever Orthopedic Dog Bed is a popular choice for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery. It features a solid 4-inch memory foam base that provides excellent support and comfort. The foam helps to relieve pressure points and promote better sleep, which is crucial for the healing process. The bed also has a water-resistant and tear-resistant cover, making it durable and easy to clean.

These beds earn consistent praise in customer reviews for their high-quality construction and affordable prices. They are available in sizes from small up to extra-large. The Friends Forever orthopedic dog beds are great choices for protecting your dog’s knee after surgery.

The Friends Forever Orthopedic Dog Bed is a well-regarded option for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery. It features an orthopedic foam mattress that provides superior support and comfort for your dog’s joints. The foam base is designed to relieve pressure points, reduce pain, and promote better sleep.

Technical aspects of the Friends Forever Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Orthopedic foam mattress for optimal support and comfort
– Water-resistant and tear-resistant cover for durability
– Non-skid bottom to prevent slipping and sliding
– Removable and machine-washable cover for easy cleaning
– Comes in multiple sizes to accommodate different dog breeds

Pros of the Friends Forever Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Provides excellent support and comfort for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery
– Water-resistant and tear-resistant cover for durability and easy cleaning
– Non-skid bottom ensures the bed stays in place
– Removable and machine-washable cover makes maintenance a breeze
– Comes in various sizes to suit different dog breeds

Cons of the Friends Forever Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Some customers have reported that the foam may lose its shape over time
– The bed may be too firm for dogs who prefer a softer surface

Recommended for: Medium to large breed dogs recovering from TPLO surgery who need a supportive and comfortable bed.


Furhaven

Furhaven Orthopedic Dog Bed for Large Dogs w/ Removable Bolsters & Washable Cover, For Dogs Up to 95...

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The Furhaven Orthopedic Dog Bed is a suitable choice for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery. It features a high-density foam base that provides excellent support and comfort for your dog. The plush sleep surface adds an extra layer of coziness, ensuring your dog can relax and rest comfortably. The removable cover makes it easy to clean and maintain the bed, while the non-skid bottom prevents it from slipping and sliding. With multiple sizes available, you can find the perfect fit for your dog’s breed.

Furhaven is another trusted brand when it comes to orthopedic dog beds. Their Deluxe Orthopedic Memory Foam model provides cushioning egg crate relief while also cradling your dog’s body for maximum comfort. An L-shaped bolster rail offers additional support.

This bed has a removable, machine-washable cover and comes in a wide selection of sizes, colors, and patterns. Hundreds of reviewers mention it being ideal for senior dogs and those recovering from surgery. It’s an excellent budget-friendly option.

Technical aspects of the Furhaven Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– The bed is made with a high-density foam base that provides optimal support and comfort for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery.
– It features a plush faux fur sleep surface that is soft and cozy for your dog to rest on.
– The cover is removable and machine-washable, making it easy to clean and maintain.
– The bed has a non-skid bottom to prevent it from sliding around on slippery surfaces.
– It comes in various sizes to accommodate different dog breeds.

Pros of the Furhaven Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Provides excellent support and comfort for dogs recovering from TPLO surgery.
– The plush sleep surface is luxurious and cozy for your dog to relax on.
– The removable cover makes it easy to clean and maintain the bed.
– The non-skid bottom ensures the bed stays in place, even on smooth floors.
– Comes in multiple sizes to suit different dog breeds.

Cons of the Furhaven Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Some customers have reported that the foam may lose its shape over time.
– The bed may be too firm for dogs who prefer a softer surface.

Recommended for: Medium to large breed dogs recovering from TPLO surgery who require a supportive and comfortable bed.


First-Quality

Casper Dog Bed, Plush Memory Foam, Medium, Sand

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First-Quality’s 5″ Thick Orthopedic Dog Bed is designed with post-operative recovery in mind. It combines dense, supportive memory foam with a waterproof inner liner and removable outer cover. The non-slip bottom keeps it securely in place.

This bed conforms closely to your dog’s body to provide pressure relief while also stabilizing the joints. It’s available in sizes from small to jumbo. Many customers recommend it specifically for aiding dogs recovering from TPLO surgery.

Technical aspects of the First-Quality Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– The bed is made with a high-quality memory foam base that provides superior support and pressure relief for dogs recovering from surgery.
– It features a soft and durable microfiber cover that is resistant to stains and odors.
– The bed has a non-slip bottom to ensure stability and prevent it from sliding on smooth surfaces.
– It comes with a waterproof liner to protect the foam from accidents and spills.
– The bed is available in various sizes to accommodate dogs of different breeds.

Pros of the First-Quality Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– The memory foam base offers excellent orthopedic support and helps alleviate joint and muscle pain.
– The microfiber cover is easy to clean and maintain, and it is resistant to stains and odors.
– The non-slip bottom ensures the bed stays in place, providing stability and safety for your dog.
– The waterproof liner protects the foam from accidents and spills, extending the bed’s lifespan.
– The range of sizes available makes it suitable for dogs of different breeds and sizes.

Cons of the First-Quality Orthopedic Dog Bed:
– Some customers have reported that the bed may flatten over time, reducing its supportiveness.
– The microfiber cover may not be as durable as other materials and may show signs of wear and tear after extended use.

Recommended for: Dogs of all sizes recovering from surgery or suffering from joint and muscle pain. The First-Quality Orthopedic Dog Bed provides superior support and comfort with its high-quality memory foam base. The waterproof liner adds an extra layer of protection and makes it suitable for dogs who may have accidents or spills. The non-slip bottom ensures stability and safety, while the range of sizes available allows for a perfect fit for dogs of different breeds.

Choosing the Right Dog Bed: Key Factors to Consider

Level of Support and Cushioning

Your top priority should be a bed that provides ample cushioning and orthopedic support. Look for features like memory foam or egg crate polyfill that will evenly distribute your dog’s weight to protect their knee joint and prevent sore spots.

Ease of Access

The bed should make it easy for your dog to get in and out without having to jump or climb. Low-profile beds or those with ramps or gradual inclines are ideal.

Waterproof and Washable Features

Since your dog will likely be spending most of their time in it, choose a bed with a waterproof inner liner and removable, washable cover for easy cleaning.

Size and Sleeping Style Compatibility

Make sure to choose the right size bed based on your dog’s weight, breed, and preferred sleeping positions. Measure your dog and look for a bed that gives them plenty of room to stretch out.

Veterinarian Approval

Check with your vet for any specific recommendations on features to look for in an orthopedic bed after TPLO surgery. Their input can help you make the optimal choice.

Rest and Activity Limitation After TPLO Surgery

Recovery Stages and Duration

The typical TPLO recovery time is 8-12 weeks, but your vet will provide you with a detailed timeline. Generally, weeks 1-2 involve the strictest confinement and crate rest. Weeks 3-6 introduce short leash walks and physical therapy. Weeks 7-12 gradually increase activity. Lifelong joint supplements are often recommended.

Adhering to Activity Restrictions

It’s absolutely vital to follow your vet’s post-op instructions exactly, including restrictions on exercise, stairs, jumping, running, and playing. Confinement and supervision are crucial to prevent your dog from overexerting themselves before the bones have fused.

Necessity of Crate Rest

Crate rest is essential for the first 2 weeks minimum after surgery, and often longer. Your dog should only leave the crate for potty breaks on a leash. Their bed should be placed right inside the crate to limit movement.

Risks of Over-Activity During Recovery

If your dog is too active during the recovery period, they risk re-injuring themselves and requiring additional surgery. Other potential complications include implant failure, fractures, and chronic lameness. Preventing over-exertion is key.

Utilizing a Dog Bed for Faster Healing Post-TPLO Surgery

Lowering Further Injury Risk

An orthopedic bed reduces the risk of your dog

re-injuring themselves during recovery by providing cushioning and minimizing impact on the joints when lying down. It also keeps them resting in the proper aligned position to protect the knee.

Comfort and Prevention of Pressure Sores

The right dog bed will make your dog more comfortable and content staying in it as directed by your vet during their restricted activity period. It prevents pressure sores from developing when they are confined for long periods.

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Promoting Proper Resting Position

Orthopedic beds encourage your dog to rest in alignment that takes pressure off the knee joint and promotes healing. This is especially important since they will be spending most of their time confined to the bed.

Facilitating Transportation to Reduce Stair Climbing

A good orthopedic bed is portable so you can easily move your dog without making them climb stairs and risk re-injury. This allows you to limit their stair use while still moving them around the house.

Additional Post-TPLO Surgery Care Tips

Physical Therapy Exercises

Your vet will prescribe certain stretching, range of motion, and strengthening exercises to help your dog regain muscle mass and function in the leg. These should be done gently and only as directed.

Medications and Supplements

Your dog will likely be prescribed anti-inflammatories and pain relievers after surgery. Joint supplements can also help support the healing process. Follow medication directions closely.

Wound Care Techniques

Proper wound care, often involving cold compresses and keeping the incision clean and dry, is important to prevent infection as the knee heals. Your vet will demonstrate proper care techniques.

Monitoring for Potential Complications

While most dogs recover well from TPLO surgery, you’ll need to watch for potential complications like excessive swelling, redness, bleeding, or difficulty bearing weight. Report any concerns to your vet promptly.

Catering to Emotional Needs

Your dog will have increased anxiety, frustration, and restlessness from being confined during recovery. Give them plenty of affection and mental stimulation with chew toys, food puzzles, etc. to ease the process.

Frequently Asked Questions About TPLO Surgery Recovery

Leaving dog alone after surgery

It is generally not recommended to leave your dog alone for extended periods of time immediately after surgery. Here are some tips for caring for your dog after surgery if you must leave them alone:

  • Confine them to a small space like a crate or small room so they don’t move around too much and irritate the surgery site. Make sure they have comfortable bedding.
  • Leave them with access to water and food if cleared by your vet. You may need to elevate the bowls to make eating and drinking more comfortable.
  • Take them out to relieve themselves before you go if possible. Consider using pee pads if they cannot go outside.
  • Leave familiar toys and treats to help them feel calm and entertained.
  • Check with your vet when short supervised absences may be okay, but limit alone time as much as possible in the first 1-2 weeks after surgery.
  • Consider having a pet sitter or friend/family member check in and stay with them if you do need to be away.

How to get dog upstairs after surgery

Here are some tips for helping your dog go upstairs after surgery:

  • Use a belly/sling harness to gently lift and support their back end as they climb up. Don’t let them jump or bound up steps.
  • Carry smaller dogs up the stairs. Support their back end as you hold them against your chest and go up one step at a time.
  • Use old towels under their belly as they go up for traction. Go slowly and let them set the pace.
  • Block access to stairs with a baby gate and carry them up/down when needed. This prevents them from attempting stairs unassisted.
  • Consider installing temporary ramps to make entry/exit easier if they will need help for more than a couple of days.
  • Reward with treats for positive stair behavior like waiting for help instead of attempting alone.
  • Speak to your vet if stairs are impossible. They may recommend confinement on one floor or physical therapy exercises to improve strength and mobility.

Can my dog sleep with me after surgery

It’s generally not recommended to allow your dog to sleep in your bed with you immediately after surgery. Here are some things to consider:

  • Jumping on and off the bed could irritate the surgery site and slow healing. Provide a comfortable bed at floor level.
  • Your movements at night could cause pain if you accidentally bump or jostle them. Confine them to a crate or pen at night instead.
  • They may have difficulty getting comfortable and need to change positions or stretch out. Give them space of their own.
  • Exceptions may be very small dogs or those who were crate-trained pre-surgery and prefer close contact for comfort. Check with your vet.
  • Wait until stitches or staples are removed and incisions are fully closed before allowing bed sharing again. This usually takes 1-2 weeks.
  • When you do allow it again, use ramps or steps to prevent jumping up. Monitor for signs of pain or discomfort.

The goal is to prevent reinjury and support healing. With guidance from your vet, slowly reintroduce activities like bed sharing once they are recovering well.

Is it bad for dogs to jump off beds

Yes, it is generally not recommended to allow dogs to jump on or off beds due to the risks of injury, especially as dogs age. Here are some specific concerns with dogs jumping on/off beds:

  • Puts stress on joints and could lead to arthritis or joint injuries over time. The impact from jumping down can be hard on their legs, knees, hips.
  • Can cause soft tissue injuries like strains or sprains in shoulders or back.
  • Risk of slipping or falling off the bed and hurting themselves.
  • Increased likelihood of developing intervertebral disc disease if prone to IVDD.
  • May irritate or reinjure dogs recovering from surgery, injuries, or mobility issues.
  • Dogs with shorter legs are at higher risk of impact injuries from jumping.

To reduce risks, use pet ramps or steps to provide easy access without jumping. Avoid high beds that require bigger jumps. Dogs that are elderly, recovering from surgery, or have mobility issues should avoid jumping completely. Discourage jumping with rewards for using ramps/steps. Consult your vet if concerned about your dog’s mobility.

Dog jumped on couch after acl surgery

If your dog has jumped up on the couch after ACL surgery, here are some things to do:

  • Check the surgery site for any swelling, redness, or discharge which could indicate torn stitches or injury. Contact your vet if you notice any problems.
  • Restrict access to furniture by using baby gates, closing doors, or using a crate when you cannot supervise.
  • Use a belly band or sling to prevent jumping up. Give support and lift them onto furniture if allowed.
  • Work on training cues like “off” or “lie down” to discourage jumping. Reward four-pawed downs.
  • Avoid enticing them onto furniture with toys, treats or attention. Reward calm floor rest.
  • Provide an orthopedic bed at floor level so they can comfortably rest.
  • Limit activity and enforce strict rest, especially in the first two weeks post-op. Excess activity can damage the surgical repair.
  • Carry them down from furniture to prevent further jumping until the ACL has healed and your vet gives the all-clear to resume normal activity.
  • Attend all recheck appointments to ensure your dog is healing properly before increasing freedom.

How long after being spayed can my dog jump

Most vets recommend restricting a dog’s activity, including jumping, for around 10-14 days after they have been spayed. However, the exact recovery timeline will vary based on factors like your dog’s health, age, and procedure specifics. Here are some general guidelines:

  • Avoid any jumping or use of stairs for at least 7-10 days post-surgery. Jumping could put stress on the internal incision site before it has healed.
  • Once stitches or staples are removed around 10-14 days, your dog may be able to resume some light activity including carefully jumping on/off low furniture.
  • But continue to avoid vigorous jumping or rough play for 2-3 weeks after the spay surgery, or as long as recommended by your vet.
  • Smaller dogs tend to recover quicker than larger, energetic dogs. An older dog may need more time before regular activity.
  • Incisions should be fully healed before resuming strenuous exercise or play times. Watch for signs of pain or swelling.
  • Follow all restrictions from your vet, allow only leashed walks, and provide a quiet space without excitement during the initial 2 week recovery period.

Why won’t my dog go up the stairs?

There are several possible reasons why a dog may be unwilling or unable to go up stairs:

  • Pain or injury – Dogs with arthritis, back problems, or recent injuries may find stairs painful. Have your vet examine your dog.
  • Age – Older dogs often develop mobility issues that make stairs difficult. Provide ramps or limit access.
  • Fear or anxiety – Some dogs are timid of stairs. Go slowly, reward with treats, and try a leash for support.
  • Lack of traction – Hardwood or slippery stairs can be hard for dogs to get traction. Add carpet runners or booties.
  • Physical limitations – Very small or flat-faced dogs may physically have trouble with stairs. Carry them when needed.
  • Vision issues – Dogs with impaired sight may have trouble navigating. Improve lighting and guide them.
  • New home – Dogs uncertain in a new home may be hesitant to explore stairs. Give them time to adjust.
  • Confusion – Dogs with cognitive decline may forget how to use stairs properly. Block access for their safety.
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If your dog suddenly refuses stairs, consult your vet to check for underlying medical issues. With patience and training, as well as safety precautions, you can often help your dog regain stair confidence.

How to lift a dog after tplo surgery

Here are some tips for properly lifting your dog after TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) knee surgery:

  • Always Here are some tips for properly lifting your dog after TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) knee surgery:
  • Always support the rear under the thighs and chest when lifting. Avoid lifting under the abdomen.
  • Use a sling placed under the belly and chest to assist with lifting. This reduces strain on the back and rear legs.
  • Lift gently and slowly. Avoid sudden movements that could shift weight onto the operated leg.
  • For small dogs, slide one hand under the chest and another under the hindquarters, then scoop up.
  • For larger dogs, bend knees and lift with legs, not back. Or have a second person help lift larger breeds.
  • Do not allow the dog to jump down, always lower them.
  • Limit lifting as much as possible by using ramps, steps, or supporting the dog as they climb stairs.
  • Restrict activity and lifting for at least 2 weeks after surgery or as directed by your veterinarian.
  • Attend physical therapy if recommended by your vet to improve recovery and mobility.
  • Handle the dog carefully when toileting on a leash, supporting the rear.

Go slowly and limit lifting duration. Proper technique is important to prevent reinjury during the recovery period after TPLO surgery.


When can I walk my dog after my hip replacement

The timeline for walking your dog after a hip replacement will depend on your individual recovery and what your surgeon recommends. Here are some general guidelines:

  • Do not walk your dog at all for at least the first 2 weeks after surgery to allow your hip time to start healing properly.
  • After 2 weeks, you may be able to take very short, slow walks with your dog, as long as you use support like a cane or walker. Start with 5-10 minute walks and gradually build up distance.
  • Wait 4-6 weeks before walking your dog for longer durations such as 30 minutes. Avoid hills or uneven terrain that could destabilize your new hip.
  • By 6-8 weeks, light walking on flat surfaces should be possible, but continue to avoid any jerking movements from your dog on the leash.
  • Build back up to your normal walking routine over 2-3 months. Let pain and fatigue guide how much you do.
  • Talk to your surgeon about when it is safe to walk your dog based on your progress with physical therapy and recovery. Take it slow. Don’t overdo walks until the hip is fully healed.

How to encourage dog to urinate after surgery

Here are some tips to help your dog urinate after surgery:

  • Take your dog outside to urinate every 2-4 hours initially after surgery. Give them ample time, and reward with treats when they go.
  • Walk slowly on leash, giving support if needed, and encourage them to urinate in their usual spots. Don’t force them to walk far if in pain.
  • Limit water intake 2-3 hours before bedtime to help them make it through the night.
  • Use a belly band or wrap for male dogs to avoid urine scald if dribbling. Change pads frequently.
  • Place pee pads in an easy to access spot if having accidents in the house. Use enzymatic cleaners to remove odor.
  • Give any prescribed pain or anti-anxiety medications to keep them comfortable and relaxed.
  • If not urinating normally after 24 hours, or showing signs of discomfort, contact your vet as soon as possible. They can check for issues like urinary retention.
  • With time, routine and encouragement, your dog should be back to their normal urination habits. Monitor them closely following any surgical procedure.

How long does it take a dog to recover from TPLO surgery?

The typical TPLO recovery time is 8-12 weeks, depending on your individual dog’s healing process. Your vet will provide a detailed recovery timeline with gradually increasing activity allowed over this period.

When can my dog start walking again after TPLO surgery?

Your dog can start going on short, leashed walks again around 2-4 weeks after surgery, but should remain confined otherwise during this period. The length of walks is gradually increased over the recovery period as healing allows.

How long do dogs need to use the crate after TPLO surgery?

Strict crate rest is typically required for a minimum of 2 weeks after surgery but often lasts 4-6 weeks. Your vet will advise on the appropriate duration based on your dog’s progress. The crate prevents over-activity during initial healing.

When can my dog swim after TPLO surgery?

Swimming should be avoided for at least 6-8 weeks after TPLO surgery to allow the bones and ligaments time to properly heal. Early swimming can cause complications like fractures or implant failure. Follow your vet’s specific timeline.

How long does TPLO surgery take to heal?

It takes a minimum of 8-12 weeks for a dog’s knee to heal after TPLO surgery. However, complete healing of the bones and ligaments can take up to 6 months. Your vet will x-ray the knee at various stages to check the progress of healing before clearing your dog to resume normal activity.

What are the restrictions after TPLO surgery?

Typical restrictions after TPLO surgery include:

  • Crate rest for 2-6 weeks
  • No running, jumping, or rough play for 8-12 weeks
  • No swimming for 6-8 weeks
  • No stair use for 6-8 weeks
  • Short, leashed walks only starting 2-4 weeks after surgery
  • No free access to run/jump – keep confined or leashed
  • Restricted activity overall to allow the knee proper time to heal

Conclusion

Recap of Important Points

Helping your dog recover comfortably and properly after TPLO surgery is crucial but can also be challenging. An orthopedic dog bed that provides ample cushioning and support is one of the best investments you can make. It will limit stress on the knee joint, prevent further injury, and keep your dog resting in optimal position.

Be sure to follow all of your vet’s post-op instructions carefully, including crate rest and activity restrictions. The recovery period usually lasts 8-12 weeks, during which your dog must avoid stairs, running, jumping, swimming, and rough play. Supporting their joint health with medication and supplements is also important.

Final Recommendations for Best Orthopedic Dog Beds

Based on orthopedic support, comfort, durability, and customer reviews, I recommend the Big Barker and PetFusion beds as top choices. The Friends Forever and Furhaven beds are also excellent budget-friendly options. Be sure to select the right size for your dog.

With the proper aftercare, most dogs go on to make a full recovery and regain complete function of their knee after TPLO surgery. An orthopedic dog bed plays a crucial role in this process by keeping them comfortable, protected, and supported.

Some key facts and statistics about TPLO surgery and recovery include:

– Over 1.2 million dogs tear their cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) each year, making it a common injury in dogs.
– TPLO (Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy) is one of the most common surgical procedures used to treat CCL tears.
– According to veterinary studies, over 90% of dogs return to normal function after TPLO surgery.
– The typical recovery time after TPLO surgery is 8-12 weeks, although it can vary depending on the individual dog and the severity of the injury.
– During the recovery period, the dog’s activity must be restricted to allow for proper healing of the bones and ligaments.
– This includes crate rest for 2-6 weeks, no running, jumping, or rough play for 8-12 weeks, no swimming for 6-8 weeks, and no stair use for 6-8 weeks.
– Short, leashed walks are usually allowed starting 2-4 weeks after surgery, but free access to run or jump should be restricted.
– Providing an orthopedic dog bed that offers ample cushioning and support is important for keeping the dog comfortable and protected during the recovery period.
– Dog knee braces can also be used to stabilize the joint after surgery and may help speed up the recovery process.
– It is crucial to follow all post-operative instructions from the vet, including medication and supplement recommendations, to ensure proper healing and prevent complications.
– With the right aftercare, most dogs can make a full recovery and regain complete function of their knee after TPLO surgery.